Sunday, November 1, 2020

These Fake Fingerprint Stickers Let You Access a Protected Phone While Wearing Gloves

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Michael Whyte
Crime Scene Officer and Fingerprint Expert with over 12 years experience in Crime Scene Investigation and Latent Print Analysis. The opinions or assertions contained on this site are the private views of the author and are not to be construed as those of any professional organisation or policing body.
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Gloves that work on touchscreen devices are nothing new—they’ve existed almost as long as smartphones have. But gloves that can unlock a mobile device that’s protected with a fingerprint reader? It might be a solution to a first world problem, but it’s a problem we’re happy is solved.

You can of course still access a fingerprint-secured smartphone using regular touchscreen-friendly gloves by simply punching in your passcode on-screen, but why should we have to give up the convenience of a feature like Touch ID for months on end just because it’s cold outside? We shouldn’t, and these Taps stickers will allow you to use your mobile device’s touchscreen and fingerprint reader, for unlocking your phone or making a purchase, even while your actual fingers (and fingerprints) are being kept warm and toasty inside a glove.

After applying a textured stick to the tip of your glove, you just have to register the it as an approved fingerprint using your smartphone’s security settings.

You might assume this would mean that anyone with a Taps sticker on their gloves could access anyone else’s protected phone. But according to its creators, using nano particle technology every single Taps sticker has an individual and unique artificial print ensuring that only your gloves can access your device. That being said, there is still the risk of someone stealing your gloves, which is easier than stealing your fingerprints, so you’ll have to weigh the security risks introduced versus the added convenience these offer.

If you’re not worried about someone swiping your gloves, the Taps will be available through a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign with delivery expected before the end of the year, assuming, as is the case with all crowdfunded products, it reaches its funding goal and production goes smoothly. An $8 early bird contribution gets you four Taps, letting you power up any two fingers on each glove. You can buy even more if you want, just don’t forget that Apple’s Touch ID limits you to just ten fingerprints on file, so don’t over do it.

SourceGizmodo
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