Sunday, November 29, 2020

CATEGORY

Crime Scene News

Forensic genealogy group helps Cumberland County investigators crack 21-year-old cold case

A popular genealogy website helped crack a cold case murder of a baby from 21 years ago. "Baby Michael" was...

How Good a Match is It? Putting Statistics into Forensic Firearms Identification

On February 14, 1929, gunmen working for Al Capone disguised themselves as police officers, entered the warehouse of a competing gang, and shot seven...

Inside the Australia body farm: Where scientists and detectives go to learn about death

The barbed wire gate creaks open, beckoning us into a most unusual paddock. A few steps forward and we all stand still, staring. The first...

Forensic breakthrough? Study suggests humans can be identified by the proteins in their hair

It’s hair-raising news for criminals on the run. Scientists behind a new study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, have worked out how to identify...

How forensic scientists fight crime by analyzing handwriting

Analysing handwriting to help solve crimes isn`t just something you see in the movies — it`s real! Patella Lewis from Q13 Fox TV, got a first-hand...

How do you recover DNA from a crime scene like Brussels?

Just days after the terrorist attacks on Brussels, the French newspaper Le Mondereported that one of the bombers’ DNA was found in the Brussels airport where...

Scientists Create New Technology That Can ID the Wearer of a Shoe

For all the advancements in forensic technology over the past two decades, some areas continue to lag. Current shoeprint analysis techniques are still relatively...

Blood and teeth samples predict a criminal’s age

Forensic biomedical scientists from KU Leuven have developed a test to predict individuals’ age on the basis of blood or teeth samples. This test...

Simple, low-cost method for DNA profiling of human hairs could help trace criminals

A simple, lower-cost new method for DNA profiling of human hairs developed by the University of Adelaide should improve opportunities to link criminals to...

Queensland police recruit drones in forensic first

In an Australian-first, Queensland Police will deploy drones to help document crime scenes. Two Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPAs) have been assigned to the QPS Photographics...

Latest news

Trees and shrubs might reveal the location of decomposing bodies

Plants could help investigators find dead bodies. Botanists believe the sudden flush of nutrients into the soil from decomposition may affect nearby foliage. If...

Are Detectives discounting the associative value of fingerprints that fall short of an identification in their investigations?

Every day, Fingerprint Experts in every latent office across the globe examine fingermarks that they determine to fall short of an identification....

Using the NCIC Bayesian Network to improve your AFIS searches

This National Crime Information Centre (NCIC) Bayesian network is based on the statistical data of general patterns of fingerprints on the hands...

DNA decontamination of fingerprint brushes

Using fingerprint brushes across multiple crime scenes yields a high risk of DNA cross-contamination. Thankfully an Australian study has discovered a quick and easy way to safely decontaminate fingerprint brushes to prevent this contamination risk and allows the brushes to be safely reused even after multiple cleaning cycles.

Detection of latent fingerprint hidden beneath adhesive tape by optical coherence tomography

Adhesive tape is a common item which can be encountered in criminal cases involving rape, murder, kidnapping and explosives. It is often the case...
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