Thursday, December 3, 2020
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crime scene

Gnawing squirrels are culprits at many crime scenes

Left to their own devices, squirrels will gnaw away not just on acorns, but also on bone. And that poses problems for forensics. “Squirrels seem...

Lost Photographs of Gruesome Italian Crime Scenes

WARNING: Some of the images below are disturbing. This article originally appeared on VICE Italy. At the beginning of the 20th century, Luigi Tomellini worked as a...

Watch How Maggots Help Solve Crimes

Forensic entomologists study how bugs colonize dead bodies to help establish a time of death. Maggots, which are actually the larvae of flies, have helped...

Exploring techniques for identifying body fluids on criminal evidence

Crime scene investigation is about to get more affordable and efficient, as researchers from the National Center for Forensic Science in Orlando, Florida, have...

Cat Hair Helps to Convict Man of Murder

For the first time ever, mitochondrial DNA from shed cat hair was accepted as evidence in a U.S. legal proceeding and helped to convict...

Video: Blood Spatter 101

The Smithsonian Channel series: Catching Killers have created an informative video to show how today, bloodstain pattern analysis is routinely used in murder investigations - analysts draw on...

A day in the life of a crime scene cleaner in Western Sydney

From gory crime scenes to severe domestic squalor to stains left by decomposing bodies, a day in the life of professional forensic crime scene...

Latest news

Trees and shrubs might reveal the location of decomposing bodies

Plants could help investigators find dead bodies. Botanists believe the sudden flush of nutrients into the soil from decomposition may affect nearby foliage. If...

Are Detectives discounting the associative value of fingerprints that fall short of an identification in their investigations?

Every day, Fingerprint Experts in every latent office across the globe examine fingermarks that they determine to fall short of an identification....

Using the NCIC Bayesian Network to improve your AFIS searches

This National Crime Information Centre (NCIC) Bayesian network is based on the statistical data of general patterns of fingerprints on the hands...

DNA decontamination of fingerprint brushes

Using fingerprint brushes across multiple crime scenes yields a high risk of DNA cross-contamination. Thankfully an Australian study has discovered a quick and easy way to safely decontaminate fingerprint brushes to prevent this contamination risk and allows the brushes to be safely reused even after multiple cleaning cycles.

Detection of latent fingerprint hidden beneath adhesive tape by optical coherence tomography

Adhesive tape is a common item which can be encountered in criminal cases involving rape, murder, kidnapping and explosives. It is often the case...
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