Wednesday, November 25, 2020

National Institute of Justice Fingerprint Source Book

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Michael Whyte
Crime Scene Officer and Fingerprint Expert with over 7 years experience in Crime Scene Investigation and Latent Print Analysis. The opinions or assertions contained on this site are the private views of the author and are not to be construed as those of any professional organisation or policing body.
- Forensic Podcast -

The Department of Justice’s National Institute of Justice (NIJ) today published The Fingerprint Sourcebook, a comprehensive examination of the science behind fingerprint identification that will serve as a definitive resource for experts in the field.

Written by more than 50 law enforcement and forensic experts worldwide, The Fingerprint Sourcebook consists of 15 chapters covering: the anatomy and physiology of friction ridge skin (the uniquely ridged skin found on the palms and soles); techniques for recording exemplars from both living and deceased subjects; the FBI’s Automated Fingerprint Identifications Systems (AFIS); latent print development, preservation and documentation; equipment and laboratory quality assurance; perceptual, cognitive and psychological factors in expert identifications; and legal issues.

Click on the picture to view the complete book in a pdf file.

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