Wednesday, November 25, 2020

How to cross-examine forensic scientists: A guide for lawyers

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Michael Whyte
Crime Scene Officer and Fingerprint Expert with over 12 years experience in Crime Scene Investigation and Latent Print Analysis. The opinions or assertions contained on this site are the private views of the author and are not to be construed as those of any professional organisation or policing body.
- Forensic Podcast -

A recent article, published in the Australian Bar Review Journal, has the potential to cause a few headaches in the witness box for Forensic Scientists and Expert witnesses everywhere.

Gary Edmond, a Law Professor at the University New South Wales, has co-authored an in-depth resource for lawyers to explore the probative value of forensic science evidence, in particular forensic comparison evidence, on the voir dire and at trial. Questions covering a broad range of potential topics and issues, including relevance, the expression of results, codes of conduct, limitations and errors, are supplemented with detailed commentary and references to authoritative reports and research on the validity and reliability of forensic science techniques.

It will likely take some time before the article spreads far and wide in the legal fratenity but all forensic technicians and experts should definitely familiarize themselves with the areas covered in the article and be prepared for type of questions that could be asked whilst in the witness box.

A copy of the article was obtained from one of the co-author’s website. You can view the article by clicking here.

The article was also featured over 2 weeks on the ‘Double Loop Podcast’, hosted by Eric Ray and Glenn Langenburg. You can listen to the podcasts below.

(Article is discussed from 5:43 onwards)

(Article is discussed from 6:45 onwards)

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