Monday, November 30, 2020

Court: Fingerprints alone don’t prove possession of a firearm

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Michael Whyte
Crime Scene Officer and Fingerprint Expert with over 7 years experience in Crime Scene Investigation and Latent Print Analysis. The opinions or assertions contained on this site are the private views of the author and are not to be construed as those of any professional organisation or policing body.
- Forensic Podcast -

Fingerprints found on a weapon should not have automatically led to the conviction of a felon for illegally being in possession of a firearm, a federal appeals court has ruled.

The U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has overturned the 9-year, 7-month sentence of Brett Combs, found guilty in Las Vegas of illegally possessing a semiautomatic rifle in 2012. At the time, he was on parole for a burglary and gun conviction in Colorado, according to court records.

The appeals court sent the case back District Court to determine if other evidence showed Combs, 34, was in actual possession of a firearm.

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